Innovation in bone healing and tissue repair

Kuros’ Synthetic Platform

Kuros has a broad platform technology for developing biomaterials based on synthetic matrices. This technology is based on a highly specific cross-linking chemistry that can be carried out in situ after application on tissues in the body, without heat generation or significant biocompatibility concerns.  One significant advantage of this technology is that the characteristics of the synthetic matrices can be easily controlled through the molecular make-up of each individual component. As such, this technology provides a high degree of flexibility in engineering the products, allowing the specifications to precisely match the clinical needs. Product characteristics that can be controlled include degradability, strength, and injectability. By utilizing different molecules for the components of the matrices, the synthetic matrices can either be soft and elastic or have a compressive strength greater than bone, for example. Degradable matrices can be designed to degrade in vivo into safe by-products that can be easily cleared from the body.

Kuros Biosciences AG
Wagistrasse 25, 8952 Schlieren, Switzerland
Tel: +41 (0)44 200 56 00   Fax: +41 (0)44 200 56 01   Email: info@kuros.ch

About Kuros

  1. Overview
  2. Management
  3. Board

Products

  1. Pipeline
  2. Orthobiologics
    Fracture repair
    KUR-111
    KUR-113
    Spinal fusion
    KUR-113
    Solitary Bone Cysts
    KUR-112
  3. Sealants
    Neuroseal (KUR-023)

Technologies

  1. Overview
  2. Fibrin-based
  3. Synthetic-based
  4. Immune modulation
  5. Publications

Partnerships

  1. Collaborations
  2. Business development

Investors

  1. Share price
  2. Regulatory filings
  3. Reports & presentations
  4. Calendar
  5. Corporate governance
  6. Stay informed

News

  1. Press releases
  2. Conferences & Events

Contact

  1. Location
Synthetic-based

Kuros’ Synthetic Platform

Kuros has a broad platform technology for developing biomaterials based on synthetic matrices. This technology is based on a highly specific cross-linking chemistry that can be carried out in situ after application on tissues in the body, without heat generation or significant biocompatibility concerns.  One significant advantage of this technology is that the characteristics of the synthetic matrices can be easily controlled through the molecular make-up of each individual component. As such, this technology provides a high degree of flexibility in engineering the products, allowing the specifications to precisely match the clinical needs. Product characteristics that can be controlled include degradability, strength, and injectability. By utilizing different molecules for the components of the matrices, the synthetic matrices can either be soft and elastic or have a compressive strength greater than bone, for example. Degradable matrices can be designed to degrade in vivo into safe by-products that can be easily cleared from the body.